4 Comments on “2021 USBC String Pinsetter Research Report – Video Summary”

  1. The string itself helping to knock down neighboring pins is definitely an issue for serious bowlers. Recreationals won’t care, and this less expensive option might work for them, but I can’t see any pros being excited about bowling on these.

  2. In no way should any USBC (or PBA or PWBA) sanctioned competition happen with string pinsetters. I guess they are okay for houses that don’t host leagues or tournaments but frankly I just wish they would go away. Now, get off my lawn.

  3. It’s unfortunate that string pinsetters represent a significant cost reduction for centers, because this just seems super wonky to me. Different string length dynamics on how people shoot spares, and the inability to go after washout strikes would change the game significantly. That, and you’ll also have interactions with the usual pin-spotting inconsistencies. That and “bullshit” acceptance for sting pinsetters is much lower. If a pin kicks out of the back and knocks into another pin, it’s the pin that’s doing it. If a string attached to the pin does it, that feels wrong. Not saying that rules-wise they would be considered differently, but that difference in FEELING is going to turn a TON of the casual tryhards (a moniker I happily apply to myself) in leagues off.

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